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My Stew And Potatoes Creation.

Still, I Can Cook.

Since I left Russia and spent the past 16 months with my family, I have not not entered the kitchen to prepare anything – not even to boil an egg, or water. Everything was always ready, and mine was to ‘come and eat.’

Now I am back home in Moscow and I have had to reacquaint myself with my kitchen. Which is a weird thing to admit because I have been cooking for myself for the last 4 years, and I was pretty good. At least I remember cooking meals that left my guests satisfied. My stew (Nigerian) was fresh, even though I almost always prepared it with the big three – salt, pepper, and maggi. I had the spirit of cooking in me. I even wrote an article about it here.

So, because I had cooked before, I knew that I could do it again. I started with noodles, then to chicken soup and potatoes (for its medicinal value). Now I’m at the level of rice and stew. I hope to reach native soups status e.g. Egusi, Ogbono, and the likes.

One thing I have learned about making stew is that you must be patient in order to make sure the tomato sauce is well fried. Sometimes, you stand by in order to stir it in the hot oil. If you don’t, you might not get that fresh taste you desire.

Likewise in our lives, if we do things in a hurry because we want quick results, we end up with very poor results.

Take the time to invest the energy into all you do, so that when you finally sit down to enjoy the “meal”, you can even…instagram it to your world.

In the words of E. W. Kenyon, whose little book, ‘Signposts on the Road to Success’ has greatly inspired me, I ask,

“Is honor and competence in old age worth saving, self-denial, and hard work in youth?”

Keep doing something!

Ike Amadi

Ike Amadi

Author of the book Do Something! I am an advocate of all things #fresh. I want to see you become a #dosomethingperson.